Training Up-date

[Training]

(Cpl. Joshua Young/Marine Corps) The Corps will no longer conduct an annual training class asking Marines to quit smoking or dipping. In fact, several annual training requirements have been consolidated or eliminated to “enable commanders to focus on events that generate warfighting readiness,” according to an administrative message published Thursday, which announced the changes. “Fleet Marine Force (FMF) commanders consistently ask for more time to train to core warfighting tasks (Mission Essential Tasks),” Marine spokesman Capt. Sam Stephenson told Marine Corps Times in a Tuesday email. “This has been a consistent theme from the FMF, formally expressed in Defense Readiness Reporting System reports, and consistently discussed at TECOM subordinate command and Headquarters Marine Corps forums.” The service is aiming to promote education, training, and continued learning among Marines so they become students of their profession. The new MARADMIN will require units to conduct chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear, or CBRN, training every fiscal year, more frequently than every other year ― as it was in the past. It also consolidates the once individual training requirements on hazing/bullying, sexual harassment and equal opportunity into one prohibited activities and conduct training event. Tobacco cessation training, along with training on social media conduct, combating trafficking, and violence prevention awareness all have been eliminated from the annual training requirement, according to the MARADMIN. To make the decision on which training events to cut and which to consolidate the Marine Corps split annual training into core and non-core requirements. Get the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup Don't miss the top Marine Corps stories, delivered each afternoon Sign up for the Marine Corps Times Daily News Roundup to receive the top Marine Corps stories every afternoon.

https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/marine-corps-times/2020/11/25/marine-corps-reduces-annual-training-by-cutting-these-requirements/

[Training]

"The CFPB can make sure that banks and financial companies are actually following those rules," Gupta says. The pandemic recession has hit many lower-income communities hardest. Aracely Panameño, director of Latino affairs at the Center for Responsible Lending, says that people in such communities are more likely to get into trouble borrowing from high-interest rate payday lenders. "They are highly concentrated in communities of color, Black neighborhoods, Latino neighborhoods," she says. The Trump administration weakened a rule that aimed to protect people who get payday loans. Panameño says she hopes the bureau can strengthen that rule. But she says in the meantime, the CFPB can still be policing deceptive or unfair helpful hints practices — not just by payday lenders, but also online lenders, and auto-title lenders who have people put their vehicles up as collateral. CFPB Strips Some Consumer Protections For Payday Loans "For a certain type of car title loans, 20% of borrowers end up in repossession — losing their car, truck," Panameño says. For their part, financial firms don't want the agency under Biden to be too aggressive. Mary Jackson, CEO of the industry group the Online Lenders Alliance, says too much regulation can prevent people from borrowing money when they need it.

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/18/935470357/financial-watchdog-expected-to-get-its-teeth-back-under-biden